Practical session at a 'Lung Function Testing in the Workplace - Introductory Level' course

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Introductory Medical Statistics - two day course

Category: statistical

14 November, 2019

FULL; REGISTRATION AND WAITING LIST ARE BOTH COMPLETELY CLOSED

Next dates: Thursday 14 to Friday 15 May 2020 - registration to open in due course

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From our November courses onwards, we are using a new booking system, and bookings are now by card only (Imperial College staff can pay by internal transfer if they wish)

The programme is accessible below. 

Registration fees (November 2019; May 2020 fees are tba) -

  • Student/trainee concessionary: £175
  • First ten NHLI/RBH delegates (non-student/non-trainee) concessionary: £280
  • Academic/NHS/corporate: £350

Course fees include handout, lunch and refreshments

Course description:

Two-day course designed to introduce anyone who uses statistics in their work or research to:

- Basic epidemiological concepts (study designs; bias and confounding; measures of risk)

- Descriptive statistics for quantitative, ordinal and qualitative data (mean, median and mode; standard deviation, percentiles and frequency distribution)

- Estimating parameters in the population (confidence intervals)

- Testing an hypothesis (p-values; types of errors – false positive and false negative results)

- Main statistical tests (parametric vs. non-parametric; paired vs. unpaired) for quantitative, ordinal and qualitative outcomes

- Correlation vs. simple linear regression to test relationships between two quantitative variables (differences in aims and links between the two approaches; simple linear regression vs. ANOVA)

- Simple logistic regression for binary outcomes

- Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses to address confounding

- Power and sample size calculations

- Basic concepts of survival analyses

The course alternates classical lectures with two practical sessions on application of the methods presented (individual work, followed by classroom demonstration and discussion), and a final session on paper critique to critically review concepts covered in the course (work in small groups, followed by classroom feed-back and discussion).

Suitable for - Doctors, nurses, clinical research fellows and postgraduate students

Accredited by the Royal College of Physicians: 12 CPD points

Venue (map can be viewed here; photos on page 2) -

National Heart and Lung Institute

Education Centre, Paul Wood Lecture Theatre

Guy Scadding Building

Dovehouse Street

London SW3 6LY

Feedback -

"Superb course that covered a vast array of medical statistical topics. As a doctor and clinical research fellow about to embark on a PhD, I would highly recommend this course to other junior doctors.Thank you!"

"Really useful introduction to statistical analysis. Highlighting the importance of study design, bias and confounding factors was very helpful. I finally understand power calculations – thank you!"

"Overall: really excellent. Helpful especially now that I’m working on analysing data – so this added a lot of clarity"

"Excellent course. Pitched at the right level for introduction. Relevant to me (Core Medical Trainee junior doctor). Well explained; opportunities for questions. Interesting, engaging speakers and affordable"

"All lectures were very informative, and the lecturers were willing to have open discussion and questions, which was nice. (...) Very, very informative and extensive (for naïve people like me who don’t have prior experience with statistics and research). I will keep it with me as a reference guide for when I get an opportunity to do research"

"Very good. Really one of the best courses in my life."

Images (from May 2019 course):

  • Main photo: Alex Adamson presents 'Introduction to statistical testing'; another image from the same presentation can be seen here. Credit: Elaine Fuertes
  • Some delegates and speakers can be seen here; James Potts presents 'Data analysis demonstration'; Winston Banya presents 'Interpretation of regression models'.  Credits: Diana van der Plaat